Magic tricks with the HTML parser | HTTP 203

Jake and NEW GUEST (for the next few episodes) Bramus chat about strange behaviors in the HTML parser. Should it be more strict? And, how you can get access to the streaming parser with JavaScript, to speed up your pages.

Simon Pieters book, "Idiosyncrasies of the HTML parser" → https://goo.gle/3PUPKGg
The HTML parsing spec → https://goo.gle/3AY8Cjr
[p] is one of the many tags whose end tag can be omitted in certain situations → https://goo.gle/3KLlBbH
Formatting elements that carry over if not closed → https://goo.gle/3CHrjZS
The adoption agency algorithm → https://goo.gle/3qevd5j
A valid XHTML document → https://goo.gle/3pWgFqG
An invalid XHTML document → https://goo.gle/3cuAJxl
The CSS parsing spec → https://goo.gle/3RDdKPF
Should severe HTML parsing issues be highlighted in DevTools? The DevTools teams says "no" → https://goo.gle/3Ri02kX
Prettier discussion on self-closing tags → https://goo.gle/3CK9nhu
Creating a detached HTML document → https://goo.gle/3Rq7Np3
Streaming a response with fetch() → https://goo.gle/3cuOKLr
Creating a streaming HTML parser in JavaScript → https://goo.gle/3RgokLW

More videos in the HTTP 203 series → http://goo.gle/HTTP203
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Also, if you enjoyed this, you might like the HTTP203 podcast → https://goo.gle/HTTP203Podcast

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